Ways To Stay Positive During Menopause

 

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Entering the menopausal stage can be terrifying and dreadful, but it can also be a phase for reflection. Although it may be innately tough, a lot of women feel a new sense of liberty and personal growth. Yes, menopause is a time of major changes. It is when mixed emotions of worry, anxiety, excitement, and erratic moods are prevalent. They say menopause is the adolescent stage of old age but only better because menopausal women are more confident and experienced. Women at this phase should be able to make choices for herself and find ways to get what they want. They should be able to take control of the remaining years of their life.

However, how women’s lives become will depend on how they will embark on this major change. Studies show that women who used to be pessimistic will tend to have a more difficult time managing their menopause. For example, the more bad thoughts they have about hot flashes, the more severe these hot flashes will be. This is why anxiety and depression are common during menopause. On the other hand, if women can transform their negative thoughts into positive ones, they will experience lesser symptoms.

Below are some great tips that can help women stay positive as they go through the menopausal phase.

 

Be Aware Of Your Thoughts

A lot of studies have shown that pessimism has a tremendous negative impact on one’s mental and emotional well-being. Women who have joined menopause programs like In My Mind Over Menopause claim that the suggestion to keep an appreciation journal is very effective in cultivating positivity and gratitude. They say that writing daily thoughts about things that they are grateful for has changed them psychologically. They have become aware of the beauty in something despite its flaws.

Smile – Or Laugh – As Much As You Can

Flaunting a smile when you enter a room of familiar faces or even strangers brings warmth to the atmosphere. It brings you closer to people and moves you and the others into a more positive mindset. Laughing also allows a person to register the things he is listening to easily. Hence, it encourages learning.

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Always Have A ‘Me Time’

You may be used to being busy the whole day with all your work and family obligations, but practice sparing a few minutes to an hour of ‘me time’ every day to clear your mind. You can do some relaxation activities like breathing, going to the spa, doing yoga, or just simply laying down in your bed or the tub with music playing in the background. Connect with your inner self and think of wonderful things that promote calmness. All these reduce menopausal symptoms especially hot flashes and mood swings.

Keep In Touch

Personal and social support is fundamental to your health and can promote a long life. It is a general truth that women need women – friends, family and significant others who have the zest and wisdom to live life to the fullest. Stay connected to other women who are going through the same path as you, and share your own stories so you can help and learn from them as well.

Practice Mindfulness

Mindfulness is being in the moment, focusing on the present and the things that you can do in the present rather than reliving the past. Mindfulness is an effective way of preventing a person from worrying about the future or regretting the past. Its techniques encourage one to think about right now, feeling great, breathing positivity, and convincing one’s self that he or she is physically, mentally, and emotionally balanced and well.

Incorporate mindfulness with meditation – closing the eyes and feeling the gratitude, the peacefulness, and the stress-free moment that one is in at the moment.

These practices allow patience, resilience, and happiness to grow from the inside out, allowing one’s anxieties and worries to disappear slowly. You eventually feel the power to change negativity into positivity.

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From The Menopausal Woman

A woman who has just gone through the menopausal phase says that she has become more aware of her capacity and responsibility to transform herself and her course in life. Despite the devastating effects of her menopausal journey, she chose to be happy and hopeful – and she was – she is.

“If this is what we call midlife, then I am lucky to have another half ahead of me. I have plenty of time to use my experiences and my wisdom to make this second half of my life richer and more meaningful.”